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EEP Investor Forum 5 December 2016

INVITATION TO APPLY

EEP S&EA will be hosting an Investor Forum in Johannesburg on Monday 5th of December 2016.

We will offer an exclusive opportunity for the EEP project developers to meet potential investors to discuss about further project financing beyond the EEP. The detailed list of the invited investors will be tailored and published after the invited projects have been decided based on the optimal matching.

Apply now for the opportunity to participate in the event and meet your potential investors. Applications are submitted and accepted only through the application form. See more details in the invitation to apply below:

EEP_Investor_Forum_Invitation_2016

If the link doesn’t open copy and paste it to the browser’s address bar: http://digiumenterprise.com/answer/?sid=1454572&chk=4UTMHSDW

Please submit your application by 3rd November 2016 at 16:00 South African time (GMT +2:00). We will contact the selected projects with further information shortly after the submissions.

Note that the event is open for the EEP funded project developers exclusively.

More  info: KPMG ECO eep.eco@kpmg.fi 


EEP Project of the year 2016 winner announcement

Photo: iSmart Kenya

Photo: iSmart Kenya

During the recent Knowledge Exchange Forum, the Energy & Environment Partnership programme (EEP) selected the winner for the ”EEP project of the year award”.

All ongoing or completed EEF funded projects were eligible to submit a nomination for this award. In total 16 applications were received for the award, of which three were shortlisted.

All three shortlisted projects were asked to present their project and nomination at the Knowledge Exchange Forum that took place on the 20th of September in Nairobi. The three shortlisted projects were Burn manufacturers (producing clean Jikokoa stoves), iSmart (selling cook stoves in peri urabn and rural areas of Kenya) and Redavia (Rental Solar Power for Food Processing in Tanzania).

All three projects provided excellent presentations on their EEP supported activities and with that the job of the selection committee became quite difficult. Eventually,

The EEP project of the Year title was awarded to the iSmart Kenya.

EEP Project director Wim Jonker-Klunne and Claire Baker from iSmart Kenya receiving the Project of the Year award

EEP Project director Wim Jonker-Klunne and Claire Baker from iSmart Kenya receiving the Project of the Year award

iSmart has been implementing an EEP funded project that supports the sales of improved cookstoves in peri urban and rural areas of Kenya. The project completed its EEP supported activities ahead of schedule and exceeded its targets, providing training and employment for 233 women and youth, and completing sales of 5,273 cookstoves. iSmart focuses on employment of disadvantaged women and youth, and through sales of clean cookstoves that not only positively affect the lives of both the customers and the sales agents economically but also bring health and environmental benefits. The project has created a clear development impact and has proven a successful business model in a challenging environment.

Congratulations to the iSmart team for this excellent performance and for winning the EEP Project of the Year Award. Next to the recognition that comes with winner the award, the project will be offered a speaking slot at the African Utility Week in Cape Town in May 2017 with the EEP programme proving travel and accommodation for one representative of iSmart to travel to Cape Town for this.

The EEP wants to thank all projects that entered the Project of the Year completion for their time and efforts in doing so. We specifically thank the three shortlisted projects to present their nomination at short notice at our KEF.

Read more about iSmart here>>

SunCulture Kenya is one of the 15 finalist of the Ocean Exchange innovation award

Women working SunCulture Kenya (photo credits: SunCulture)

Women working, SunCulture Kenya (photo credits: SunCulture)

EEP funded project by SunCulture Kenya is one of the 15 finalists to compete for the innovation award

The sixth annual Ocean Exchange, held in Savannah, Georgia, will feature fifteen worldwide solutions with the ability to generate economic growth and increase productivity while reducing the use of nature’s resources and the production of waste. The innovators will present the solutions and compete for one of two $100,000 awards
from worldwide sponsors Gulfstream Aerospace Corp. and Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics (WWL).

This year’s Solutions Inspiring Action are from five different countries, including an EEP supported project SunCulture Kenya. The project is creating a solar powered irrigation system for smallholder farmers to grow high value fruits and vegetables, enabling impactful increases in family income. Read more about the project here>>

The finalists are:
  • Atom Switch Solid State Circuit Breakers by Atom Power: USA (NC)
    Solid-state circuit breaker technology with benefits of safety, dynamic response, control, metering & energy savings in stationary and marine applications.
  • Carbon-Capturing Lightweight Hybrid Composites by RRTC: USA (NJ)
    Carbon-sequestering lightweight hybrid composite material for structural components in land, air, and water transportation.
  • CorPower Ocean: Sweden: Wave Energy Converter (WEC) for cost effective electricity generation, inspired by pumping principles of the human heart.
  • Greening the Coastal Deserts by Atmocean: USA (NM)
    Zero electricity reverse osmosis desalination system powered by renewable wave energy to establish new cropland using drip irrigation of desalinated water.
  • HTC BioProcessor: Sweden
    Cost effective sludge handling system for municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants that transforms remaining sludge into renewable, solid, bio-coal fuel.
  • HySiLabs: France
    Unique safe, stable liquid hydrogen fuel, which provides a usage experience similar to current liquid fuels, allowing a smooth transition from fossil to alternative fuels.
  • Q.Rad by Qarnot Computing: France
    A smart, digitally connected heater, the first to use embedded microprocessors as a heat source for use in homes, public buildings, and offices.
  • SAROS Desalination by Eco-H2O Innovations: USA (NC)
    A buoy that converts seawater to drinking water without electricity, using renewable wave energy to power pumps for reverse osmosis.
  • SolarVIA™ by 510Nano: USA (NC)
    Photovoltaic technology to generate solar energy at lower per unit costs by increasing production using off the shelf mounting systems.
  • Solvatten: Sweden
    A combined portable water treatment system and solar water heater for household use in the developing world for safe drinking water, cooking, and hygiene.
  • StingRAY Wave Power by Columbia Power Technologies: USA (VA)
    Cost effective and reliable wave energy system to generate electric power for utilityscale grids.
  • Sun Buckets: USA (IL)
    Cooking device that uses solar energy to help the impoverished cook without the use of biomass-based fuel, open flame, or emissions.
  • SunCulture: Kenya  Solar powered irrigation system for smallholder farmers in the developing world to grow high value fruits and vegetables, enabling impactful increases in family income.
  • Turbulent Hydro by Turbulent: Belgium
    New hydropower technology inspired by the natural shape of a vortex, to provide smart decentralized energy production in a turnkey system with standard components.

Read more>>

Join us for coffee!

EEP Coordination Office is hosting a coffee hour for EEP Project developers during the African Utility Week in Cape Town.

 

The coffee hour  is an opportunity to meet the ECO Team and other EEP project developers. This informal networking event will be organized in close proximity to the CTICC.

Date and time: Tuesday 17 May 2016 at 12h00 – 13h00

 

Registration guidelines:

  • Please confirm your interest to participate by emailing eep.eco@kpmg.fi address by May 10th, 2016.
  • Use an email topic ‘Coffee hour‘ and indicate your EEP project code and how many people will participate.
  • Note that this is a limited invitation only to project developers who have been awarded with EEP S&EA grant (PhaseI and Phase II)
  • After the registration, the ECO team will send the participants further information of the venue.

 

We hope to see you in Cape Town!

 

 

Most frequently asked questions – CfP12 and Cfp13

Herewith the most frequently asked questions for the both currently open Calls (CfP12 and CfP13)

 

1. General

1.1.Are there windows open now?

A: We have currently open two windows: CfP12 for Early stage projects and CfP13 for Market Ready projects. The deadline for the submission of applications is April 25th, 2016 at 10h00 (South African time, GMT+2).

1.2.How should I apply?

A: You can find the Guidelines regarding how to apply, the online application, as well as its appendixes from: http://eepafrica.org/how-to-apply/

1.3 Can our organisation submit several applications in total, for different country/countries? It is said in the Guidelines that: “Each organisation should submit ONLY ONE application for a given country.”

A: Yes, you can submit more than one application if they are located in different countries. It is however needed to be kept in mind that the funds available for each call are limited. Please also note that it is possible for an applicant to submit one application per country in both CfP12 and in CfP13 windows.

There are in total 13 countries in which the proposed project should take place: Botswana, Burundi, Kenya, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, Seychelles, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia.

1.4. Can I modify the appendix templates?

A: Yes you can do (minor) modifications to the templates if needed. Please remember to ensure that you still provide relevant (requested) and clear information in the appendixes.

1.5. Where is the Administrative Manual for Project Implementation?
A: It can be found in the footer of the EEP website under Project Guidelines Documents -> Annex III or by following this link: http://eepafrica.org/wp-content/uploads/Administrative-manual-for-project-implementation_June-2014.pdf

1.6. What is the ECO?
A: It is the EEP Coordination Office.

1.7. What should I do if I do not receive a confirmation email on my application?
A: Send an email to eep.cfp@kpmg.fi

1.8. What happens if the project milestones are not met?
A: The project implementation duration for CfP12 and CfP13 selected projects is strictly a maximum of 15 months. If a project experiences delays for a specific milestone, the delay must be communicated to the EEP Coordination Office as soon as possible, but at least 3 weeks before the due date of milestone reporting date. The final report deadline should remain unchanged.

1.10. What happens if the project is not completed by the end of the EEP phase II?
A: The project implementation duration for CfP12 and CfP13 selected projects is strictly a maximum of 15 months. The project funding cannot be guaranteed to be continued after the end of the second phase.

2.    Partners

2.1.    The applicant entity is registered abroad, do we need to have a local partner?

A: Yes, if the applicant entity is not based within the (eligible) country of project implementation, the applicant must have at least one local Partner in the country. The local partner must have a clear role in the project implementation. The partner does not have be locally owned. It is sufficient to have operations in the eligible country in question.

Please note that international development agencies, donor agencies, donor driven trust funds and project implementation units set up for other projects are not eligible as local Partners.

2.2.    The applicant entity is registered abroad, but has a local subsidiary in the country of implementation to implement the project. Is it sufficient to list this subsidiary as the local partner or are additional local partners necessary to have?

A: Yes a local subsidiary in the country of implementation is sufficient to list as the local partner. The project applicant and the partner(s) together need to have sufficient experience in technical, financial, project management as well as monitoring and evaluation.

2.3.    Is it acceptable to include governmental departments on the list of partners?

A: Yes, governmental departments can be included as local partners but however not as the main applicant.

3.    Grants and co-financing

3.1.    What are the amounts of the grants?

A: CfP12 is for Early stage projects (grants vary between 100 k€ – 300 k€). The minimum co-financing share for CfP12 projects is 30% of the total project cost.

CfP13 is for Market Ready projects (grants vary between 200 k€ – 1000 k€). The minimum co-financing share is 30-90% dependent on the size of the grant applied. Please check the needed co-financing share from the Guidelines (http://eepafrica.org/application-documents/).

The applied grant can be any amount between the indicated values.

3.2.    Can you please clarify the calculation method for the funding table? E.g. for a Max Grant Level of 200 000€ minimum Co-financing is stated as 30%.

A: The co-financing is calculated of the total project budget. For example, if the total project budget is 285,714.29 EUR, 30% of that amount is 85,714.29 EUR. So it is 30% of the total project budget, not the EEP amount.

Calculation 285,714.29 x 0,30 = 85,714.29 for co-financing and 285,714.29 -85,714.29 = 200,000 for the grant.

This can also be calculated other way i.e. if the grant amounts to 200,000.00 the calculation for co-financing is: 200,000.00(grant)/(1,0-0,30)-200,000.00 (grant)= 85,714.29 (minimum requirement of co-funding for a grant of 200,000 euro.

3.3.    Are there some limitations for the co-financing?

A: There is no upper limit for co-financing and the applicants are encouraged to provide co-financing above the minimum required amount, which is many cases demonstrate credible ownership, risk sharing and commitment.

If the project has open applications for grant funding to the same project scope from other sources, details on the applied funding must be documented in the application. In addition, applicants need to present a plan on how to proceed in case funding from both/several sources are granted. Information should be provided to ensure full accountability of the funds and no overlapping of funding is acceptable.

The EEP funds should be considered as catalytic “seed funding” to support concrete and sustainable projects. Therefore there has to be complete clarity on matched financing needs to be supported by evidence prior to first payment of the grant, in the form of equity or an external signed financing contract.

The sources of co-financing can be various. Even ODA co-financing from another institutional donor is possible. However, in case it comes from any of the institutional donors that are involved in the EEP of Southern and East Africa (MFA/Finland, DFID/UK or ADA/Austria) the applicant is requested to provide information if funding has been received or applied for these sources. The applicants are requested to further indicate how they will ensure full accountability of the funds.

3.4.    Can the co-financing of the applicants be in kind contribution (time spent by the researchers, space, utilities, equipment, training)?
A: No, in-kind contribution is not accepted as part of own co-financing. The own contribution part is supposed to ensure that the organization has funds to implement the project. In case the in-kind contribution is considerable it is however good to mention it and the added value that it brings for a successful project implementation.

3.5.    To what extent will EEP funding cover field staff and consulting costs? Can home office support be expensed to EEP?

A: There is no minimum or maximum %-limit for field staff and consulting costs. However, it is important that the overall budget of the projects is aligned with the minimum co-financing share (please see CfP12 and CfP13 Guidelines). Home office support (rent and working hours) can be expensed to EEP. It is however important to remember that all expenses should be well reasoned that they are adding value to the project scope.

3.6.    To what extent will EEP fund research and development costs?

A: There is no minimum or maximum %-limit to fund research and development costs. However, each budget item needs to be well reasoned how it is adding value to the scope and implementation. The overall budget of the projects is aligned with the minimum co-funding share (please see CfP12 and CfP13 Guidelines).

3.7.    Will funding cover costs for training of distributors who are not direct staff?

A: It is possible to cover costs for training of distributors who are not direct staff. Please carefully explain the added value of each budget item on how the cost is supporting to the scope and implementation.

4.    Eligible applicants

4.1.    What types of applicants are eligible?

A: Eligible applicants for project financing by the Programme are:
•    private companies (also start-up companies can apply);
•    public institutions;
•    research organisations;
•    educational institutions;
•    charitable organisations;
•    Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs);
•    Community Based Organisations (CBO);
•    Not-for-Profit Organisations (NPO); and,
•    Cooperative Organisations.

4.2.    Are there limitations for the location of the applicant?

A: Applicants from any country are welcome to apply. However, if the applicant is not based within the (eligible) country of project implementation, the applicant must have at least one local Partner in the country with relevant capacity and credible long-term interest in activities related to the project. Any local Partner must have a major role in the project implementation.

4.3.    What kind of experience is required from the applicant?

A: The project applicant and the partner(s) together need to have sufficient experience in technical, financial, project management as well as monitoring and evaluation areas. A due diligence will be conducted as part of final proposal stage.

4.4.    May a Project Company (name xxx) or University register as the lead applicant?

A: Yes, registered companies, universities and other registered organizations are eligible to apply for EEP project financing. Please check eligible applicants.

4.5.    I would like to find out whether it is possible to apply in CfP12 or in CfP13 even though we have also applied in the previous Calls?

A: Yes, it is possible to apply again in CfP12 and / or in CfP13, but please note that the requirements are different for each CfP. Please also note the following:

In CfP12: Any applicant bidding for a second set of financing for the same project type (feasibility study, pilot, demonstration) must either be at the end of, or near completion of the previous project in order to demonstrate success and a move towards market readiness. If bidding for a second feasibility, pilot or demonstration in a second country the applicant must be able to demonstrate strong evidence of success of the previous project first. No re-funding for same project in same country is possible unless there is a clear move from one project type to another that shows clear progress in that country.

In CfP13: Any applicant bidding for a second set of financing for the same project type (scale-up, replication or rejuvenation) must either be at the end of, or near completion of the previous project in order to demonstrate success and market readiness. If bidding for a second scale-up, replication or rejuvenation project in a second country the applicant must be able to demonstrate strong evidence of success of the previous project first. No re-funding for same project in same country is possible unless there is a clear move from one project type to another that shows clear progress in that country.

4.6.    We operate in one of the thirteen countries and will now apply funding for another similar project that will take place in another country. We wonder whether the project is a demonstration or a scale-up.

A: If you operate at least in one country already and expand to a new country, the project is classified as a scale-up project, not a demonstration. In this kind of a case, please classify your project as a scale-up project, and apply in CFP13 window.

5.    Suitable projects

5.1.    Does my project type fit in CfP12 or CfP13?
A: The Energy and Environment Partnership Programme with Southern and East Africa (EEP S&EA) contains of a challenge fund that seeks high-quality applications for projects in the Southern and East African regions that can contribute to the reduction of poverty by improving energy security while mitigating global climate change. CfP12 is for Early stage projects and CfP13 is for Market ready projects.

The CfP12 project activities must be implemented as “last-mile” feasibility studies, pilot or demonstration projects. In turn, the CfP13 considers the following types of projects: scale up to commercial operation, replication of commercially proven concepts to new markets or rejuvenation of existing renewable energy and energy efficiency generation.

You can find more information and detailed criteria in the Guidelines (http://eepafrica.org/application-documents/).

5.2.    Where should the project take place?
A: The project should take place in one of the thirteen counties (or a combination of them): Botswana, Burundi, Kenya, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, Seychelles, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia.

5.3.    Does the project submitted under CfP12 or CfP13 need to be a follow-up of a previous EEP project?
A: No, the project does not have to be a follow-up of an EEP project (e.g. feasibility, pilot, etc.).

5.4.    Is it possible to obtain re-funding? 
A: Applicants who have received funding in previous EEP-S&EA Calls for Proposals (CfPs) are allowed to participate in this call. However, any applicant bidding for a second set of financing for the same project type (feasibility study, pilot, demonstration, scale-up) must either be at the end of, or near completion of the previous project in order to demonstrate success and a move towards market readiness. If bidding for a second feasibility, pilot or demonstration in a second country the applicant must be able to demonstrate strong evidence of success of the previous project first. No re-funding for same project in same country is possible unless there is a clear move from one project type to another that shows clear progress in that country.

6.     Financial

6.1.    What if my company is younger than 3 years and I don’t have three year’s financial statements?
A: Please explain in the application that the company is young, when it has been registered and that it therefore is not possible to have financial statements for three years.

6.2.    What kinds of guarantees are required as proof of co-financing?
A: Complete clarity on matched financing needs to be supported by evidence prior to first payment of the grant. g. At first proposal stage the co-funding is assessed based on the applicant’s availability of committing the co-funding by the first milestone. Evidence of co-funding at first milestone should be in place in the form of equity or an external signed financing contract.

6.3.    What happens if the PD does not venture the necessary funding within the required timescales?
A: Typically the necessary funding is ventured within the required timescale. Should this not be possible, there may be contractual consequences.

6.4.    What are the timelines for payment for successful applications? Can one put in a typical timeline for this?
A: The ECO’s expectation is that the projects are contracted in August – September 2016. Starting from these months, each project will get payments according to the schedule set as part of the reporting and payment schedule (RPS) and approved milestone report.

6.5.    For each payment, how long does the disbursement take after proof of milestone has been submitted?
A: ECO team aims to disburse the funds within 30 days of the sufficient report submission

6.6.    How should other Grant funds be reported? Is there a limit to the amount of own financing that can come from other grants?
A: There is no upper limit for co-financing and the applicants are encouraged to provide co-financing above the minimum required amount, which is many cases demonstrate credible ownership, risk sharing and commitment.

If the project has open applications for grant funding to the same project scope from other sources, details on the applied funding must be documented in the application. In addition, applicants need to present a plan on how to proceed in case funding from both/several sources are granted. Information should be provided to ensure full accountability of the funds and no overlapping of funding is acceptable.

The EEP funds should be considered as catalytic “seed funding” to support concrete and sustainable projects. Therefore there has to be complete clarity on matched financing needs to be supported by evidence prior to first payment of the grant, in the form of equity or an external signed financing contract.

The sources of co-financing can be various. Even ODA co-financing from another institutional donor is possible. However, in case it comes from any of the institutional donors that are involved in the EEP of Southern and East Africa (MFA/Finland, DFID/UK or ADA/Austria) the applicant is requested to provide information if funding has been received or applied for these sources. The applicants are requested to further indicate how they will ensure full accountability of the funds.

6.7.    What is the exact scale with which one should calculate the required co-funding?
A: A MS Excel Spreadsheet will be provided for PD’s.

6.8.    Does the audited financial report need to be provided in Euros?
A: No, audited financial report can be in local currency.

6.9.    Can we submit unaudited financial report and provide our audited financials report when they will be available? Do we have to submit the audited financial statements for the Partners also?
A:  Yes, You can submit unaudited financials, but make a note of that in your proposal that the audited financial statements will be provided at a later stage or the reason why you do not conduct an audit in your organization. You have to submit the audited financial statements of the lead applicant only.

7.    Application

7.1.    Which documents do PD’s have to download and complete?
Every document in the Annex has to be completed. The Annex name corresponds directly to the section number. For example, Annex document D.2 is a Microsoft Excel workbook which must be downloaded, completed, and submitted in the online application step D.2.

7.2.    Do PD’s have to upload documents that are not included in the document Annex?
Yes, the documents in steps D.6-D.10 must be independently uploaded. The project developers should upload only the requested annexes.

7.3.    What should PD’s do if they submit the application and want to edit some information?
A:  After submission of the application, no changes can be made. If something goes completely wrong with the submission, the applicants can contact the EEP Coordination office (eep.cfp@kpmg.fi).
Applications that pass the first proposal stage can be slightly modified in the final proposal stage.

8.    Contacts

8.1.    Where can I find national contacts?
A: You can find the national contacts from: http://eepafrica.org/contact-us/national-contacts/

8.2.    Q: Who can I contact if I need more information regarding to EEP?
A: Please contact EEP.CFP@kpmg.fi

9.    Appendices

9.1.    C1 – Project cost and financing:

9.1.1.    Project budget summary – do PD’s have to indicate when the funds will come through?
A: It is expected that sufficient funds are available when they are needed in the project.

9.1.2.    Item C: How does this form part of the entire budget?
A: Please check that the Project budget summary and the detailed budget are in alignment,

9.1.3.    If you have committed engineering time/resources to the development of the project, can it be claimed retrospectively?  What exactly constitutes ‘in kind’ ?
A: Engineering time / resources cannot be claimed retrospectively. In kind means performing project activities that do not involve money.

9.1.4.    Do the ineligible expenses in Section 7.2 of the Admin Manual form part of the total project budget. If the PD covers the legitimate ineligible expenses, shouldn’t it be considered to be part of the total project budget.
A: Ineligible expenses cannot be part of the total project budget. The project developer should have a separate budget for such items.

9.1.5.    What rates are acceptable for project cost financing through EEP?  For example, to what degree can professional rates differ for the same service?
A: The procurement process supports healthy cost-structure. The project developers are advised to compare prices of any services / products that they purchase.

9.2 C2 – Procurement plan:

9.2.1 If you wish to access a specific company’s core competency or unique product as an essential part of the procurement, what steps should be taken?

A: Please see Section 5 of the Administrative Manual regarding several practical details.

9.3 D1 – Annex 1:

9.3.1 Can the co-financing be provided only at the end of the project? What assurance/security does the applicant have to provide for EEP to provide funding?

A: In D.3 Annex III (Reporting and payment schedule) the applicant provides an overview of the split regarding co-financing and the EEP grant at the different stages of the project. It is expected that the co-financing is available throughout the project.

9.3.2 Who will confirm that the deliverable for every corresponding sub-activity is fulfilled?

A: The EEP Coordination office will check/confirm that the deliverable has been fulfilled.

9.3.3 Should there be a buffer time for the project schedule to ensure completion before the close of the phase?

A: It is expected that the project will manage the given time schedule.

9.4 D2 – Annex 2:

Ensure that activities from D1 are used in column A of this document.

 

9.5 D3 – Annex 3:

9.5.1 What happens if a project developer cannot contribute the necessary percentage by the end of a specific milestone? Same as 2.3.

A: It is possible that there will be contractual consequence.

9.5.2 Where are the milestone report templates?

A: Look under http://eepafrica.org/how-to-implement/programme-document/ for the NEW progress report template.

9.5.3 What’s the earliest date for the first milestone report submission?

A: The earliest date is not defined. It is based on the reporting and payment schedule annex.

9.5.4 What are the minimum and maximum number of milestones allowed?

  1. A) The milestones are project specific and their number may vary. The recommendation is that there would be 3-5 milestones. One period should not exceed 6 months.

9.6 D4 – Annex 4:

9.6.1 How are these claims going to be verified?

A: The expected outputs indicators will be verified during field visit and EEP calculation standards will be used.

9.6.2 What formulas and typical emission factors should be used in calculations for baseline and reduction figures?  

A: EEP will provide a reference formula and constants sheet in order to simplify the calculations.
9.7.    D11 – Annex 11

9.7.1.    Is having a partner advantageous to the application?
A: Any project partner should have a clear role and responsibilities in the project. The project partners’ activities should be well defined and explained how they support the project.

9.7.2.    What do you require to prove partnerships?
A: MoU or letter of intent.

 

 

Announcement of CFP12 and CFP13

As a challenge fund, the EEP S&EA Programme is seeking high-quality applications for projects that can contribute to the reduction of poverty by improving energy security while mitigating global climate change.

 

EEP Southern and East Africa Opens Simultaneously Two Funding Windows for Early Stage (CfP12) and Market Ready (CfP13) Projects. Both Windows Are Now Open For First Proposal Submissions.

 

The submission deadline is April 25th, 2016 at 10h00 (South African time, GMT+2).

The projects supported in CfP12 can be “last-mile” feasibility studies, pilot or demonstration projects. The scope of this Call for Proposals (CfPs) is limited to projects that deal with the development phase of renewable energy and energy saving/energy efficiency projects. The proposed project must comprise of activities that are part of a cycle leading to further investment and sustainable commercialization. The maximum grant allocation for a selected CfP12 project can fall in the range € 100 000 – 300 000.

The projects supported in CfFP13 are scale up to commercial operation, replication of commercially proven concepts to new markets (nationally or internationally) and rejuvenation of existing renewable energy and energy efficiency generation projects. Market Ready is to offer financing to projects that have a particularly strong possibility for raising other (commercial) sources of finance for project implementation, replication and/or scaling up. As concrete outputs, this result area will be characterized by the development of bankable renewable energy and energy efficiency demonstration of project proposals that involve technological, financing or business model innovation. The maximum grant allocation for a selected CfP13 project can fall in the range € 200,000 – € 1,000,000.

Read more and click here to apply>>

Press release: EEP Announces Opening of Two Funding Windows (download and share!)

 

 

 

Upcoming EEP Funding

New Call for Proposals planned to be soon launched in the EEP S&EA Programme

 

The EEP S&EA Programme is in the process of soon launching two new Calls for Proposals (CfP12 and 13), the first one focusing on early stage support for projects and the second one for market ready projects.

The Call for Proposals with the updated early stage and market ready outlines aims to form the basis for successful future projects and the success of the EEP.

Please subscribe for the Programme newsletter to receive further information on the launch, the targets of the EEP characteristics of a solid application, guidelines on the application procedures, restrictions and eligibility criteria for funding, and project categories.

 

Each application need to adhere to the following rules in having the opportunity to obtain EEP funding:

  • A clear development rationale and an economic rationale;
  • Additionality;
  • Sustainable development outcomes,
  • Minimization of market distortions;
  • Credible contribution to achieving systemic market impact; and
  • Ensure milestones align incentives with commercial partners.

In both the early stage and market ready windows specific attention needs to be given to gender issues, poverty reduction, innovation and difficult markets. Applicants are required to include clarity on who the customers/beneficiaries are.

The EEP S&EA Programme cannot include topics relating to tobacco, alcohol, and topics on corporate manners not conforming to good responsibility practices.

The illustration below outlines the proposed structure of these CfPs.

Outline of proposed EEP CFPs

Design and implementation of the two new funding windows of EEP

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The new Call for Proposals aim to support the following types of projects:

Feasibility Study (CfP12 – Early Stage Window)

Analysis and evaluation of a proposed project to determine technological, social and environmental viability, as well as feasibility within the estimated cost and economic viability. The Feasibility Study may be a refinement of a pre-feasibility study and should present enough information for investors to finance the next stage of the project. Investors may typically be part of the feasibility work to ensure smooth transition from the feasibility to a pilot or demonstration financing. The expected output from a feasibility project is a “bankable feasibility study” acceptable for financiers with all the necessary agreements in place e.g. permits and licenses, environmental impact assessment (EIA) approvals, access to land and other business specific requirements according to the laws of the country where the project is to be implemented. Optimal is further to reach feedstock supply agreements and power purchase agreements.

Pilot Project (CfP12 – Early Stage Window)

Testing of an RE/EE product, service, and business or delivery model, including social and local appropriateness on a small scale, for the first time, or in a new market, , in order to ensure the conditions and operational details regarding e.g. feasibility, time, cost, size and risks before large scale roll out or commercialization. Pilot projects should form part of an overall market development strategy. For a pilot project to be approved for an EEP grant, the project proposal should clearly indicate further steps envisaged towards larger roll out or commercialization after the piloting phase.
As opposed to a demonstration project, a pilot project does not strive to prove and gather evidence that a product/service or a technology works in the selected circumstances but is intended to test and develop new products, services, and/or business or delivery models so that the project can optimize the procedures and gather lessons learned for a roll out or a commercialization in the following phases of the project.

Demonstration project (CfP13 – Market Ready Window)

A project has in the pilot phase gained experience that the tested product/service or a technology can be successfully implemented in the selected location for implementation. In the demonstration phase the project strives to establish evidence that a project, a product/service and business or delivery model works in a specific context, such as the geographical or socio-economic area, and could be applied elsewhere in similar circumstances. This may show the performance of a product/service or a technology in actual conditions, or it may encourage the trial use or purchase of the product/services or technology in the target market. For a demonstration project to be approved for EEP grant, the project proposal should clearly indicate the specific context and describe further steps towards roll out or commercialization. The demonstration project proposal should also provide basis for a high probability that the product/service or a technology can be successfully implemented in the selected location for implementation, such as experiences gained from other markets, or in test environments or through a pilot project.

Scale up to Commercial operation (CfP13 – Market Ready Window)

A project has proven evidence that a concept, a product/service or a technology and business or delivery model works, and there is a high probability of reaching commercial viability with the applied “bridging finance” from EEP. Evidence might have been gathered through a demonstration project but also in some cases from a pilot project which has proven to be a successful concept.
For the CFP13, the focus is on promising local private sector RE/EE project opportunities that are close to commercial maturity but need a limited amount of ‘bridging’ finance to enable sustainable business growth and or to obtain commercial operation. Applications should provide information on the maturity of the business or project and why EEP S&EA funding would be required e.g. by elaborating on the level of commercial maturity of the project or business, and the estimated commercial operation. The application must clearly demonstrate what the bridging finance is required for, why this funding has not been obtained or cannot be obtained from other sources, to what extent other sources of finance have been explored or used for the project, how and when would the business or project graduate to a level where it could obtain commercial funding etc.

Replication of commercially proven concepts to new markets (CfP13 – Market Ready Window)

Technology advancements have resulted in a number of RE/EE products and solutions suitable for medium to large-scale commercial and industrial applications. Whereas these RE/EE solutions are tried and proven in developed countries or in some of the regional markets, there might still be relatively little practical experience with them in Southern and East African markets. Replication projects can help provide local knowledge and experience, prove the cost effectiveness of chosen technologies in generating and/or saving energy (compared to existing alternatives), help identifying and addressing market barriers (e.g. policy, regulatory, financing, capacity) and subsequently generate market demand which would in turn result in the creation of new business and employment opportunities.
Applicants need to demonstrate an understanding of the target market e.g. what is the current demand and future growth potential, and how the target market differs from those markets where the solutions have already proven successful. A replication can be conducted either nationally to a different geographical area within the existing country or by going international to another EEP partner country.

Rejuvenation of existing renewable energy and energy efficiency generation (CfP13 – Market Ready Window)

Rejuvenation projects restore existing non- or partially operational renewable energy and energy efficiency generation systems back to operational status and/or more effective status by introducing modern solutions to them. Typically, the target market and customers are already existing, but for some reason the system has lost its functionality or it is not efficient and viable any more. Rejuvenation projects are particularly worth implementing if cost effectiveness can be shown. They create new employment opportunities, enhance access to modern energy services and that way provide opportunities for businesses. Funding for rejuvenation projects can be given to the generation component of an energy system but not to the energy distribution component of the system.

For a rejuvenation project to be approved for EEP grant, the project proposal should clearly explain the background, viability and expected outcomes for the project. Sustainable operation after the project needs to be demonstrated, as well as a (management) plan to avoid falling back into the non-operational status.

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Mobisol – Smart High Quality Solar Solutions for 30,000 households in Tanzania

Mobisol Tanzania, the Tanzanian subsidiary of the Germany-based solar service provider Mobisol, has come a long way from a promising EEP pilot project in Tanzania in 2011. Mobisol is now East Africa’s largest rent-to-own solar service provider by capacity installed and a reputable company with 185 permanent employees and over 200 freelancers in Tanzania. Mobisol has so far electrified over 35,000 households in East Africa and has installed more than 3.5MW solar capacity. In total they have saved over 15,500 tons/year of CO2 emissions by substituting fossil fuels.

 The EEP fund helped pave the way for this solar revolution in Tanzania: Initial funding was an important facilitator for the development of the high-quality product-service-offer and the necessary infrastructure. The trust and support of early strategic and financial partnerships has enabled Mobisol Tanzania to thrive and to become a company that now brings clean and affordable solar energy to thousands of people in Tanzania, provides education and economic opportunities and contributes to global environmental protection.

 Mobisol’s work and impact have been honoured by a number of prestigious recognitions such as a “Momentum for Change” Award by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the PV Magazine Award for “Top Business Model 2015” and the Off-Grid Expert Award. Mobisol’s CEO has been honoured as “Social Innovator of the Year 2015” by the Technology Review and the company has been recognized as “EEP Project of the Year” Finalist and was honoured by SUSTAINIA as one of the TOP10 sustainable solutions in the world.

Mobisol’s success story has manifested itself in a number of important milestones reached:

High-quality products affordable to rural Tanzanian customers

 Mobisol has developed an innovative product design and service offering fully adjusted to Tanzanian customers’ needs: The mature product-service offer combines high-quality solar products, innovative IT solutions and remote monitoring, microfinance via mobile banking and comprehensive customer services. Mobisol’s products are made affordable by a rent-to-own instalment scheme offering micro-finance loans over a period of 36 months in small, flexible instalments which are payable via Mobile Money.

 The plug’n play Mobisol system is quickly installed by locally trained and certified technicians. It includes a solar panel, battery, solar controller, lights, as well as cell phone chargers. The system is available in three different sizes between 80 and 200 Watts. The systems can illuminate entire households, and power e.g. laptops, radios, TVs, fridges and charge cell phones. The larger systems are powerful enough to run energy-based businesses.

Mobisol’s Lighting Global certified 80 Wp solar home system

Mobisol’s Lighting Global certified 80 Wp solar home system

Comprehensive services adjusted to customers’ needs

Mobisol solar systems come complete with an extended warranty and comprehensive customer service. A full service package complete with free installation by certified technicians, free maintenance for three years including a free-of-charge service hotline and 48 hours repair service, is standard. Through the GSM modem included in the solar controller, technical data regarding the panel, battery and energy consumption is tracked and monitored by local technicians in a web-based interface. The remote monitoring technology allows potential maintenance problems to be addressed swiftly and enables systems to be locked automatically in case of theft or overdue repayment.

Mobisol customer service ensures the solar systems’ maintenance

Mobisol customer service ensures the solar systems’ maintenance

Employment and capacity building in rural off-grid regions

Mobisol is empowering rural entrepreneurs to start their own energy-based businesses. Approximately one third of Mobisol’s customers earn incremental income by running energy-based businesses such as by charging mobile phones and solar lanterns, running barber salons or operating village cinemas.

 In order to further capacity building and job generation in structurally underemployed regions, Mobisol has developed the “Mobisol Akademie” concept. The Mobisol Akademie was established in 2014 to train local entrepreneurs working as Mobisol technicians and sales staff to effectively service customers, while supporting the sustainable growth of the company. The Mobisol Akademie trains and certifies all customer facing staff and has so far trained over 700 people. The company has so far employed 350 full-time employees and empowered over 300 small entrepreneurs working as contractors, with over 90% of the team working in Tanzania and Rwanda.

 

The Mobisol Akademie has so far trained over 700 staff in East Africa

The Mobisol Akademie has so far trained over 700 staff in East Africa

Positive impact on the quality of life, health, education and economic opportunities of rural communities

 Mobisol has so far electrified over 35,000 households in East Africa and has installed more than 3.5MW solar capacity. Over 175,000 indirect beneficiaries are profiting from an electrification infrastructure made possible by Mobisol.

Owning their personal electricity source has a positive socio-economic impact on low-income households. Customers reported that efficient, bright LED bulbs and longer light hours increased family productivity; in the evening customers are able to work and children have light to do their homework thereby improving education levels. Over 100,000 children were enabled to study at night with clean efficient solar light. Mobisol clients no longer have to travel long distances to shops with diesel generators to charge their cell phones. Additionally, Mobisol solar home systems avoid dangerous fumes which, according to the World Bank, cause approximately 600,000 premature deaths in Africa per year. To emphasize their commitment to sustainable socioeconomic and ecological development, Mobisol has become a certified B Corporation – a designation that requires companies to meet high standards of social and environmental performance, transparency, and accountability.

The Mobisol system provides for households’ entire energy needs

The Mobisol system provides for households’ entire energy needs

Contribution to global environmental protection

Mobisol’s solar product-service packages compensate for traditionally used market alternatives of kerosene, diesel generators and open flames from wood or candles. Mobisol currently saves over 15,500 tons/year of CO2 emissions by substituting fossil fuels.

All systems come with extended warrantees and free maintenance for a long and extendable period thus ensuring the sustainability of the systems. During system operation the battery is permanently protected from overcharge and deep discharge by the solar controller. The batteries are particularly designed for solar applications, therefore they provide a characteristic deep cycle ability with a long lifetime expectancy. Mobisol additionally offers a recycling program for batteries. All batteries come affixed with the Mobisol controller – a stand-alone measurement and control unit complete with charge controller and an integrated GSM module. The charge controller measures voltage and bi-directional current measurements of the battery, load and solar panel and communicates all data via the GSM network to the remote monitoring database – which enables for swift trouble-solving in case of maintenance issues. Mobisol lights are high-quality efficient LEDs.

Mobisol Tanzania has developed a carbon offset project in cooperation with myclimate, whose climate protection projects are characterised by their compliance with very strict environmental and social criteria.

Mobisol’s solar systems replace dirty kerosene lamps

Mobisol’s solar systems replace dirty kerosene lamps

A scalable, replicable business model which is already being implemented in other countries

 The success of the company in Tanzania has proven the feasibility of the business model and led Mobisol to develop a broader strategy for sustainable scale-up, to secure more financial and strategic partners and expand into a new project country: Rwanda. Scalability and replicability were further emphasized by a cooperation with the Rwandan Government, the largest Rwandan mobile network operator MTN and the European Union to jointly facilitate access to clean and reliable energy for a total of 49,000 Rwandese households and 1,000 schools. Within five years, 50,000 high quality solar systems will be supplied and installed to reach approximately 645,000 beneficiaries in the Eastern Province of Rwanda.

Celebrating 10,000 Mobisol systems installed in Rwanda

Celebrating 10,000 Mobisol systems installed in Rwanda

 Incubator for further innovation

Mobisol aspires to provide clean, reliable electricity to millions of households in low-income communities. After having successfully installed 35,000 live systems in Tanzania and Rwanda and having proven the feasibility of the concept, Mobisol is now moving into the business at a larger scale. Mobisol is currently working on expansion strategies into further markets and expanding their product portfolio – thereby piloting visionary new ideas such as a solar-powered done delivery network.

Piloting new ideas: Mobisol drones are delivering solar appliances

Piloting new ideas: Mobisol drones are delivering solar appliances

Here are some videos displaying Mobisol’s work and impact:

  • Welcoming Mobisol’s 20,000th customer: https://vimeo.com/133522790
  • Introduction of the Mobisol Akademie: https://vimeo.com/103890197
  • Mobisol tests solar powered Drone Delivery Network: https://vimeo.com/148290428
  • Mobisol service animation: https://vimeo.com/37653157

 

Learn more and visit Mobisol’s website here>>