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Renewables have surpassed coal last year to become the largest source of installed power capacity in the world

About 500,000 solar panels were installed every day last year as a record-shattering surge in green electricity saw renewables overtake coal as the world’s largest source of installed power capacity.

The International Energy Agency announced that it has significantly increased its five-year growth forecast for renewables thanks to strong policy support in key countries and sharp cost reductions. Even though coal is still the leader in the overall energy generation globally, the renewables have, for the first time, surpassed it in the installed power capacity. Solar and wind power are the two main technologies.

Read more>>

 

 

  

 

 

The Proof Is In The Cooking – study on innovative business model

Inyenyeri is a for-profit renewable energy company, whose mission is to break the cycle of energy poverty, through the provision of a fuel and Fan Gasifying Cook Stove solution, which can be sustainably scaled to serve more than 2 million Rwandan households.

The Innovative Business Model by Inyenyeri is closely followed by other pellet producers in Southern and East Africa. As many pellet producers are struggling with the demand side of the business the Inyenyeri Business Model could be the solution that creates the demand. If Inyenyeri succeeds in growing their business according to their plans to provide for over 25,000 households by early 2018 and returning strong profits, this could turn out to be an ground-breaking model for the pellet market.

Read the EEP publication The Proof Is In The Cooking to learn about the innovative business model>>

 

IEA: Global energy investment down 8% in 2015 with flows signalling move towards cleaner energy

A newly released report by the International Energy Agency EIA shows that global energy investment fell by 8% in 2015, with a drop in oil and gas upstream spending outweighing continued robust investment in renewables, electricity networks and energy efficiency.

The report provides a comprehensive insight to the investments in the energy sector, across fuels, technologies and countries. The analysis reveal that the energy sector is undergoing extensive a reorientation toward low-carbon energy and efficiency.  The government policies play a significant role in the energy transition.

While the report shows promising signs toward the clean energy investment on a global scale, it warns that “investment in key clean energy technologies needs to be further ramped up to put the world economy on track for climate stabilisation”.

Read the full article here>>

 

Knowledge Exchange Forum – registration has been closed


Fourth Knowledge Exchange Forum (KEF)

Nairobi // Tuesday 20 September // the Hilton hotel at 08:00 am 


Due to unexpected high number of registrations, we have exceeded the venue capacity and the registration have been closed. Thank you for all who registered and we look forward to meet you in Nairobi! 

About the event

The KEF concept has been developed by EEP as a main tool in sharing knowledge and experiences between EEP project developers and other stakeholders in the industry.

The positive feedback we received on our earlier KEFs in Johannesburg (2014), Dar-es-Salaam (December 2015) and Windhoek (June 2016) enables us to present you an event that is specifically geared towards EEP project developers. It will see a combination of presentations on the current status of (renewable) energy in the region, options and possibilities for support to your respective projects, announcement of the EEP Project of the Year Award 2016 and of course ample opportunity to share experiences, learn from each other and to network.

Read the Agenda of the forum here:

KEF Nairobi September 2016-programme

 

The two days following the KEF, the East Africa Power Industry Convention (EAPIC) will take place next door at the KICC on 21 & 22 September. This will offer you the opportunity to participate in our KEF and the following day attend the opening address of the EAPIC and visit the associated exhibition and technical workshops. For those of you that are able to stay the two additional days, you can also participate at the EAPIC conference. The opening addresses, technical workshops and exhibition of EAPIC are free of charge to attend.

Details on the event can be found at http://www.eapicforum.com/

 


 

ICT playing instrumental role in Mobisol’s successful business model – video

Mobisol Tanzania, the Tanzanian subsidiary of the Germany-based solar service provider Mobisol, has come a long way from a promising EEP pilot project in Tanzania in 2011. Mobisol is now East Africa’s largest rent-to-own solar service provider by capacity installed and a reputable company with 185 permanent employees and over 200 freelancers in Tanzania. Mobisol has so far electrified over 35,000 households in East Africa and has installed more than 3.5MW solar capacity. In total they have saved over 15,500 tons/year of CO2 emissions by substituting fossil fuels. Currently Mobisol is growing at a yearly rate of over 250% and will expand to other East African countries in 2016.

The Mobisol’s business model combines solar energy, mobile technology and microfinance. The ICT plays a key role in the success, enabling the company to use an advance remote monitoring on each individual system sold and follow-up the monthly payments by their customers.

Watch Mobisol’s video:

Read more about the Mobisol project here>> 

Read an article by United Nations Climate Change Newsroom on ‘ICT Helping Tackle Climate Change,
Could Help Cut Global Emissions 20% by 2030″

 

Photo credit: Mobisol Tanzania

Knowledge Exchange Forum was held 2 June in Windhoek

EEP Knowledge Exchange Forum

EEP S&EA was hosting its third Knowledge Exchange Forum on the 2nd of June 2016 in Windhoek, Namibia. The event gathered together around 80 participants from private sector and government agencies. The event was opened by the Deputy Director for Energy of the Namibian Ministry of Mines & Energy, Mr. Nico Snyders.

After a welcome address by the Deputy Head of Mission of the Finnish Embassy to Namibia, Ms. Elisabet Kivimaki, the funding partners of the EEP programme (Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Finland, UK Department of International Development and Austrian Development Agency) addressed the audience.

Mr. Nokwazi Moyo of UNIDO informed the participants on the current status of the establishing of the Southern African Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (SACREEE), while EEP Programme Director Wim Jonker Klunne did give a status overview of the EEP programme.

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The remainder of the day consisted of presentations and lively round table discussions. The presentations covered topics such as corporate social responsibility by Riikka Sievänen (ECO team, KPMG) and Boston Nyer (BURN), energy efficiency by James Hayes (ECO team), overview of the renewables in the region and EEP update by Wim Jonker-Klunne (ECO team), business development support by Anni Korhonen (ECO team, KPMG) and Riikka Sievänen, and an overview of SACREEE. All the presentations are available at bottom of this page.

The round table discussions received lots of positive feedback and the discussions around each topic were fruitful. The four topics were: 1) Energy access: cooking energy, 2) Project financing: how to attract long-term investors after a successful pilot/ scale-up project, 3) Policy environment: what are the barriers and how to encourage to support new technologies and productive use of energy? And 4) Corporate Social Responsibility.

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As a summary to each topic, by not having a single solution, there were many opposing arguments but also some harmonious views. In cooking energy, an interesting point for example was the introduction of hybrid solutions, where two or several technologies and business models could work together better than stand-alone approaches. This would also require more cooperation between different project developers to come up with more comprehensive energy solutions. The serious health concerns were also pointed out. Still many people in African continent are not having access to clean cooking energy and it is causing more deaths than malaria and tuberculosis and AIDS together.

How to attract long-term investors after a successful pilot or scale up project was also a conversation where many opposing arguments were given. Some participants felt that further support from international agencies could help and make the investing decisions easier, whereas others argued that especially governmental agencies can also harm the financing flow by slowing down the processes. In general, it was agreed that still more market demonstration is needed to prove that the sustainable energy solutions can provide good return on investments. In order to attract investors, all crucial elements of the business plan need to be in place, including the financing plan, clear concept and comprehensive risk management.

The discussions around the policy environment were pointing out the importance of enabling policies; policies that rather enable the greater uptake of renewable energy than red-taping new opportunities. The participants also felt that government and international agencies could take a more active role in dissemination information around renewable energy project financing, mapping e.g mini-grids and in policy harmonization. An important point was also made that each of us as an individual are the most important stakeholders to make the changes we need. What are also required, are stability and consistency in policies so that they, again, would rather enable than limit the new sustainable energy solutions.

The last topic, corporate social responsibility was also seen as a component that can create long-term assets and sustainability for a business. However, many argued that especially in Africa it is difficult to compete with CSR qualities, when some other competitors do not care about them and they compete with lower price. The CSR was seen as important investment in future and an important component to build up the communities around the region. Again, more government enabling practices and policies could support this development.

Overall, the feedback from the participants was very positive, scoring 8 or better (1-10).

The EEP Coordination Office wants to thank everyone who participated the Forum and made it a success. EEP S&EA will be organizing another Knowledge Exchange Forum in Nairobi later this year.

 

The presentations during the Knowledge Exchange Forum:

KEF introduction and overview of the EEP Programme

EEP Business Development Support

KEF Corporate Social Responsibility

KEF Energy Efficiency

SACREEE Presentations at KEF Windhoek

RECP brochure

 

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Join us for coffee!

EEP Coordination Office is hosting a coffee hour for EEP Project developers during the African Utility Week in Cape Town.

 

The coffee hour  is an opportunity to meet the ECO Team and other EEP project developers. This informal networking event will be organized in close proximity to the CTICC.

Date and time: Tuesday 17 May 2016 at 12h00 – 13h00

 

Registration guidelines:

  • Please confirm your interest to participate by emailing eep.eco@kpmg.fi address by May 10th, 2016.
  • Use an email topic ‘Coffee hour‘ and indicate your EEP project code and how many people will participate.
  • Note that this is a limited invitation only to project developers who have been awarded with EEP S&EA grant (PhaseI and Phase II)
  • After the registration, the ECO team will send the participants further information of the venue.

 

We hope to see you in Cape Town!

 

 

Most frequently asked questions – CfP12 and Cfp13

Herewith the most frequently asked questions for the both currently open Calls (CfP12 and CfP13)

 

1. General

1.1.Are there windows open now?

A: We have currently open two windows: CfP12 for Early stage projects and CfP13 for Market Ready projects. The deadline for the submission of applications is April 25th, 2016 at 10h00 (South African time, GMT+2).

1.2.How should I apply?

A: You can find the Guidelines regarding how to apply, the online application, as well as its appendixes from: http://eepafrica.org/how-to-apply/

1.3 Can our organisation submit several applications in total, for different country/countries? It is said in the Guidelines that: “Each organisation should submit ONLY ONE application for a given country.”

A: Yes, you can submit more than one application if they are located in different countries. It is however needed to be kept in mind that the funds available for each call are limited. Please also note that it is possible for an applicant to submit one application per country in both CfP12 and in CfP13 windows.

There are in total 13 countries in which the proposed project should take place: Botswana, Burundi, Kenya, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, Seychelles, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia.

1.4. Can I modify the appendix templates?

A: Yes you can do (minor) modifications to the templates if needed. Please remember to ensure that you still provide relevant (requested) and clear information in the appendixes.

1.5. Where is the Administrative Manual for Project Implementation?
A: It can be found in the footer of the EEP website under Project Guidelines Documents -> Annex III or by following this link: http://eepafrica.org/wp-content/uploads/Administrative-manual-for-project-implementation_June-2014.pdf

1.6. What is the ECO?
A: It is the EEP Coordination Office.

1.7. What should I do if I do not receive a confirmation email on my application?
A: Send an email to eep.cfp@kpmg.fi

1.8. What happens if the project milestones are not met?
A: The project implementation duration for CfP12 and CfP13 selected projects is strictly a maximum of 15 months. If a project experiences delays for a specific milestone, the delay must be communicated to the EEP Coordination Office as soon as possible, but at least 3 weeks before the due date of milestone reporting date. The final report deadline should remain unchanged.

1.10. What happens if the project is not completed by the end of the EEP phase II?
A: The project implementation duration for CfP12 and CfP13 selected projects is strictly a maximum of 15 months. The project funding cannot be guaranteed to be continued after the end of the second phase.

2.    Partners

2.1.    The applicant entity is registered abroad, do we need to have a local partner?

A: Yes, if the applicant entity is not based within the (eligible) country of project implementation, the applicant must have at least one local Partner in the country. The local partner must have a clear role in the project implementation. The partner does not have be locally owned. It is sufficient to have operations in the eligible country in question.

Please note that international development agencies, donor agencies, donor driven trust funds and project implementation units set up for other projects are not eligible as local Partners.

2.2.    The applicant entity is registered abroad, but has a local subsidiary in the country of implementation to implement the project. Is it sufficient to list this subsidiary as the local partner or are additional local partners necessary to have?

A: Yes a local subsidiary in the country of implementation is sufficient to list as the local partner. The project applicant and the partner(s) together need to have sufficient experience in technical, financial, project management as well as monitoring and evaluation.

2.3.    Is it acceptable to include governmental departments on the list of partners?

A: Yes, governmental departments can be included as local partners but however not as the main applicant.

3.    Grants and co-financing

3.1.    What are the amounts of the grants?

A: CfP12 is for Early stage projects (grants vary between 100 k€ – 300 k€). The minimum co-financing share for CfP12 projects is 30% of the total project cost.

CfP13 is for Market Ready projects (grants vary between 200 k€ – 1000 k€). The minimum co-financing share is 30-90% dependent on the size of the grant applied. Please check the needed co-financing share from the Guidelines (http://eepafrica.org/application-documents/).

The applied grant can be any amount between the indicated values.

3.2.    Can you please clarify the calculation method for the funding table? E.g. for a Max Grant Level of 200 000€ minimum Co-financing is stated as 30%.

A: The co-financing is calculated of the total project budget. For example, if the total project budget is 285,714.29 EUR, 30% of that amount is 85,714.29 EUR. So it is 30% of the total project budget, not the EEP amount.

Calculation 285,714.29 x 0,30 = 85,714.29 for co-financing and 285,714.29 -85,714.29 = 200,000 for the grant.

This can also be calculated other way i.e. if the grant amounts to 200,000.00 the calculation for co-financing is: 200,000.00(grant)/(1,0-0,30)-200,000.00 (grant)= 85,714.29 (minimum requirement of co-funding for a grant of 200,000 euro.

3.3.    Are there some limitations for the co-financing?

A: There is no upper limit for co-financing and the applicants are encouraged to provide co-financing above the minimum required amount, which is many cases demonstrate credible ownership, risk sharing and commitment.

If the project has open applications for grant funding to the same project scope from other sources, details on the applied funding must be documented in the application. In addition, applicants need to present a plan on how to proceed in case funding from both/several sources are granted. Information should be provided to ensure full accountability of the funds and no overlapping of funding is acceptable.

The EEP funds should be considered as catalytic “seed funding” to support concrete and sustainable projects. Therefore there has to be complete clarity on matched financing needs to be supported by evidence prior to first payment of the grant, in the form of equity or an external signed financing contract.

The sources of co-financing can be various. Even ODA co-financing from another institutional donor is possible. However, in case it comes from any of the institutional donors that are involved in the EEP of Southern and East Africa (MFA/Finland, DFID/UK or ADA/Austria) the applicant is requested to provide information if funding has been received or applied for these sources. The applicants are requested to further indicate how they will ensure full accountability of the funds.

3.4.    Can the co-financing of the applicants be in kind contribution (time spent by the researchers, space, utilities, equipment, training)?
A: No, in-kind contribution is not accepted as part of own co-financing. The own contribution part is supposed to ensure that the organization has funds to implement the project. In case the in-kind contribution is considerable it is however good to mention it and the added value that it brings for a successful project implementation.

3.5.    To what extent will EEP funding cover field staff and consulting costs? Can home office support be expensed to EEP?

A: There is no minimum or maximum %-limit for field staff and consulting costs. However, it is important that the overall budget of the projects is aligned with the minimum co-financing share (please see CfP12 and CfP13 Guidelines). Home office support (rent and working hours) can be expensed to EEP. It is however important to remember that all expenses should be well reasoned that they are adding value to the project scope.

3.6.    To what extent will EEP fund research and development costs?

A: There is no minimum or maximum %-limit to fund research and development costs. However, each budget item needs to be well reasoned how it is adding value to the scope and implementation. The overall budget of the projects is aligned with the minimum co-funding share (please see CfP12 and CfP13 Guidelines).

3.7.    Will funding cover costs for training of distributors who are not direct staff?

A: It is possible to cover costs for training of distributors who are not direct staff. Please carefully explain the added value of each budget item on how the cost is supporting to the scope and implementation.

4.    Eligible applicants

4.1.    What types of applicants are eligible?

A: Eligible applicants for project financing by the Programme are:
•    private companies (also start-up companies can apply);
•    public institutions;
•    research organisations;
•    educational institutions;
•    charitable organisations;
•    Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs);
•    Community Based Organisations (CBO);
•    Not-for-Profit Organisations (NPO); and,
•    Cooperative Organisations.

4.2.    Are there limitations for the location of the applicant?

A: Applicants from any country are welcome to apply. However, if the applicant is not based within the (eligible) country of project implementation, the applicant must have at least one local Partner in the country with relevant capacity and credible long-term interest in activities related to the project. Any local Partner must have a major role in the project implementation.

4.3.    What kind of experience is required from the applicant?

A: The project applicant and the partner(s) together need to have sufficient experience in technical, financial, project management as well as monitoring and evaluation areas. A due diligence will be conducted as part of final proposal stage.

4.4.    May a Project Company (name xxx) or University register as the lead applicant?

A: Yes, registered companies, universities and other registered organizations are eligible to apply for EEP project financing. Please check eligible applicants.

4.5.    I would like to find out whether it is possible to apply in CfP12 or in CfP13 even though we have also applied in the previous Calls?

A: Yes, it is possible to apply again in CfP12 and / or in CfP13, but please note that the requirements are different for each CfP. Please also note the following:

In CfP12: Any applicant bidding for a second set of financing for the same project type (feasibility study, pilot, demonstration) must either be at the end of, or near completion of the previous project in order to demonstrate success and a move towards market readiness. If bidding for a second feasibility, pilot or demonstration in a second country the applicant must be able to demonstrate strong evidence of success of the previous project first. No re-funding for same project in same country is possible unless there is a clear move from one project type to another that shows clear progress in that country.

In CfP13: Any applicant bidding for a second set of financing for the same project type (scale-up, replication or rejuvenation) must either be at the end of, or near completion of the previous project in order to demonstrate success and market readiness. If bidding for a second scale-up, replication or rejuvenation project in a second country the applicant must be able to demonstrate strong evidence of success of the previous project first. No re-funding for same project in same country is possible unless there is a clear move from one project type to another that shows clear progress in that country.

4.6.    We operate in one of the thirteen countries and will now apply funding for another similar project that will take place in another country. We wonder whether the project is a demonstration or a scale-up.

A: If you operate at least in one country already and expand to a new country, the project is classified as a scale-up project, not a demonstration. In this kind of a case, please classify your project as a scale-up project, and apply in CFP13 window.

5.    Suitable projects

5.1.    Does my project type fit in CfP12 or CfP13?
A: The Energy and Environment Partnership Programme with Southern and East Africa (EEP S&EA) contains of a challenge fund that seeks high-quality applications for projects in the Southern and East African regions that can contribute to the reduction of poverty by improving energy security while mitigating global climate change. CfP12 is for Early stage projects and CfP13 is for Market ready projects.

The CfP12 project activities must be implemented as “last-mile” feasibility studies, pilot or demonstration projects. In turn, the CfP13 considers the following types of projects: scale up to commercial operation, replication of commercially proven concepts to new markets or rejuvenation of existing renewable energy and energy efficiency generation.

You can find more information and detailed criteria in the Guidelines (http://eepafrica.org/application-documents/).

5.2.    Where should the project take place?
A: The project should take place in one of the thirteen counties (or a combination of them): Botswana, Burundi, Kenya, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, Seychelles, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia.

5.3.    Does the project submitted under CfP12 or CfP13 need to be a follow-up of a previous EEP project?
A: No, the project does not have to be a follow-up of an EEP project (e.g. feasibility, pilot, etc.).

5.4.    Is it possible to obtain re-funding? 
A: Applicants who have received funding in previous EEP-S&EA Calls for Proposals (CfPs) are allowed to participate in this call. However, any applicant bidding for a second set of financing for the same project type (feasibility study, pilot, demonstration, scale-up) must either be at the end of, or near completion of the previous project in order to demonstrate success and a move towards market readiness. If bidding for a second feasibility, pilot or demonstration in a second country the applicant must be able to demonstrate strong evidence of success of the previous project first. No re-funding for same project in same country is possible unless there is a clear move from one project type to another that shows clear progress in that country.

6.     Financial

6.1.    What if my company is younger than 3 years and I don’t have three year’s financial statements?
A: Please explain in the application that the company is young, when it has been registered and that it therefore is not possible to have financial statements for three years.

6.2.    What kinds of guarantees are required as proof of co-financing?
A: Complete clarity on matched financing needs to be supported by evidence prior to first payment of the grant. g. At first proposal stage the co-funding is assessed based on the applicant’s availability of committing the co-funding by the first milestone. Evidence of co-funding at first milestone should be in place in the form of equity or an external signed financing contract.

6.3.    What happens if the PD does not venture the necessary funding within the required timescales?
A: Typically the necessary funding is ventured within the required timescale. Should this not be possible, there may be contractual consequences.

6.4.    What are the timelines for payment for successful applications? Can one put in a typical timeline for this?
A: The ECO’s expectation is that the projects are contracted in August – September 2016. Starting from these months, each project will get payments according to the schedule set as part of the reporting and payment schedule (RPS) and approved milestone report.

6.5.    For each payment, how long does the disbursement take after proof of milestone has been submitted?
A: ECO team aims to disburse the funds within 30 days of the sufficient report submission

6.6.    How should other Grant funds be reported? Is there a limit to the amount of own financing that can come from other grants?
A: There is no upper limit for co-financing and the applicants are encouraged to provide co-financing above the minimum required amount, which is many cases demonstrate credible ownership, risk sharing and commitment.

If the project has open applications for grant funding to the same project scope from other sources, details on the applied funding must be documented in the application. In addition, applicants need to present a plan on how to proceed in case funding from both/several sources are granted. Information should be provided to ensure full accountability of the funds and no overlapping of funding is acceptable.

The EEP funds should be considered as catalytic “seed funding” to support concrete and sustainable projects. Therefore there has to be complete clarity on matched financing needs to be supported by evidence prior to first payment of the grant, in the form of equity or an external signed financing contract.

The sources of co-financing can be various. Even ODA co-financing from another institutional donor is possible. However, in case it comes from any of the institutional donors that are involved in the EEP of Southern and East Africa (MFA/Finland, DFID/UK or ADA/Austria) the applicant is requested to provide information if funding has been received or applied for these sources. The applicants are requested to further indicate how they will ensure full accountability of the funds.

6.7.    What is the exact scale with which one should calculate the required co-funding?
A: A MS Excel Spreadsheet will be provided for PD’s.

6.8.    Does the audited financial report need to be provided in Euros?
A: No, audited financial report can be in local currency.

6.9.    Can we submit unaudited financial report and provide our audited financials report when they will be available? Do we have to submit the audited financial statements for the Partners also?
A:  Yes, You can submit unaudited financials, but make a note of that in your proposal that the audited financial statements will be provided at a later stage or the reason why you do not conduct an audit in your organization. You have to submit the audited financial statements of the lead applicant only.

7.    Application

7.1.    Which documents do PD’s have to download and complete?
Every document in the Annex has to be completed. The Annex name corresponds directly to the section number. For example, Annex document D.2 is a Microsoft Excel workbook which must be downloaded, completed, and submitted in the online application step D.2.

7.2.    Do PD’s have to upload documents that are not included in the document Annex?
Yes, the documents in steps D.6-D.10 must be independently uploaded. The project developers should upload only the requested annexes.

7.3.    What should PD’s do if they submit the application and want to edit some information?
A:  After submission of the application, no changes can be made. If something goes completely wrong with the submission, the applicants can contact the EEP Coordination office (eep.cfp@kpmg.fi).
Applications that pass the first proposal stage can be slightly modified in the final proposal stage.

8.    Contacts

8.1.    Where can I find national contacts?
A: You can find the national contacts from: http://eepafrica.org/contact-us/national-contacts/

8.2.    Q: Who can I contact if I need more information regarding to EEP?
A: Please contact EEP.CFP@kpmg.fi

9.    Appendices

9.1.    C1 – Project cost and financing:

9.1.1.    Project budget summary – do PD’s have to indicate when the funds will come through?
A: It is expected that sufficient funds are available when they are needed in the project.

9.1.2.    Item C: How does this form part of the entire budget?
A: Please check that the Project budget summary and the detailed budget are in alignment,

9.1.3.    If you have committed engineering time/resources to the development of the project, can it be claimed retrospectively?  What exactly constitutes ‘in kind’ ?
A: Engineering time / resources cannot be claimed retrospectively. In kind means performing project activities that do not involve money.

9.1.4.    Do the ineligible expenses in Section 7.2 of the Admin Manual form part of the total project budget. If the PD covers the legitimate ineligible expenses, shouldn’t it be considered to be part of the total project budget.
A: Ineligible expenses cannot be part of the total project budget. The project developer should have a separate budget for such items.

9.1.5.    What rates are acceptable for project cost financing through EEP?  For example, to what degree can professional rates differ for the same service?
A: The procurement process supports healthy cost-structure. The project developers are advised to compare prices of any services / products that they purchase.

9.2 C2 – Procurement plan:

9.2.1 If you wish to access a specific company’s core competency or unique product as an essential part of the procurement, what steps should be taken?

A: Please see Section 5 of the Administrative Manual regarding several practical details.

9.3 D1 – Annex 1:

9.3.1 Can the co-financing be provided only at the end of the project? What assurance/security does the applicant have to provide for EEP to provide funding?

A: In D.3 Annex III (Reporting and payment schedule) the applicant provides an overview of the split regarding co-financing and the EEP grant at the different stages of the project. It is expected that the co-financing is available throughout the project.

9.3.2 Who will confirm that the deliverable for every corresponding sub-activity is fulfilled?

A: The EEP Coordination office will check/confirm that the deliverable has been fulfilled.

9.3.3 Should there be a buffer time for the project schedule to ensure completion before the close of the phase?

A: It is expected that the project will manage the given time schedule.

9.4 D2 – Annex 2:

Ensure that activities from D1 are used in column A of this document.

 

9.5 D3 – Annex 3:

9.5.1 What happens if a project developer cannot contribute the necessary percentage by the end of a specific milestone? Same as 2.3.

A: It is possible that there will be contractual consequence.

9.5.2 Where are the milestone report templates?

A: Look under http://eepafrica.org/how-to-implement/programme-document/ for the NEW progress report template.

9.5.3 What’s the earliest date for the first milestone report submission?

A: The earliest date is not defined. It is based on the reporting and payment schedule annex.

9.5.4 What are the minimum and maximum number of milestones allowed?

  1. A) The milestones are project specific and their number may vary. The recommendation is that there would be 3-5 milestones. One period should not exceed 6 months.

9.6 D4 – Annex 4:

9.6.1 How are these claims going to be verified?

A: The expected outputs indicators will be verified during field visit and EEP calculation standards will be used.

9.6.2 What formulas and typical emission factors should be used in calculations for baseline and reduction figures?  

A: EEP will provide a reference formula and constants sheet in order to simplify the calculations.
9.7.    D11 – Annex 11

9.7.1.    Is having a partner advantageous to the application?
A: Any project partner should have a clear role and responsibilities in the project. The project partners’ activities should be well defined and explained how they support the project.

9.7.2.    What do you require to prove partnerships?
A: MoU or letter of intent.